SRJC oaks just the latest to be mourned

Gaye LeBaron, THE PRESS DEMOCRAT
SRJC-oakHere’s the “nut graf” for this column, as we say in the trade: It has been said, by respected historians, that forests were so dense in the eastern part of what would become the United States that, before European settlement, a squirrel could travel from the Atlantic seaboard to the Mississippi River without touching the ground.
This is a terrific image, isn’t it?
Of course, we are now told, by iconoclastic bloggers, that it isn’t true. That the Native Americans cleared land just like the latecomers, that forests recede on their own and, I suppose, that no squirrel has that kind of stamina. Thus, the westbound squirrel, leaping from leafy treetop to treetop, passes into folklore. But the point is still taken. There were plenty of trees here in the 1600s. And most of them are gone.
The reason I bring this up is the current news that some of Santa Rosa Junior College’s majestic oaks, which have long defined that beautiful campus, are doomed.
This is admittedly very bad news. The account I read estimated they were about 100 years old. I’m not an arboreal scientist, but I do know that the SRJC campus was built on a 40-acre parcel of “oaks and wildflowers” that was owned by the Chamber of Commerce and designated for a park called Luther Burbank Creation Gardens, honoring the famed horticulturist who died in 1926.
via LeBaron: SRJC oaks just the latest to be mourned | The Press Democrat.

Leave a Reply